CARROLL SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICT

  • Principles of Soil Health Workshop Offered to Western Maryland Farmers

     The Washington County Soil Conservation District and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) invite farmers and agricultural land managers to a Soil Health Field Day, Wednesday, April 13, 2016 in Keedysville. The workshop will begin at 9 a.m. at the University of Maryland - Western Maryland Research & Education Center, 18330 Keedysville Rd, and conclude no later than 3:30 p.m.

    The workshop will focus on the Principles of Soil Health, and how soil health practices can enhance productivity, profitability, and environmental conservation of agricultural operations.  Ray ‘The Soils Guy’ Archuleta, the NRCS Southeast Regional Soil Health Specialist, will provide experiential learning through hands-on demonstrations and field exercises.  NRCS District Conservationist, Adam Daughtery, will provide a presentation how improving soil health changed Coffee County, TN.  Paul Salon, the NRCS Northeast Regional Soil Health Specialist, will provide insight on designing design effective cover crop mixes.

     Registration is free and lunch will be provided.  Space is limited.  If you plan to attend, please RSVP by Monday, April 4, 2016, to Allison Moore, at (301) 797-6821, Ext. 3 or e-mail Allison.moore@maryland.gov.

  •  

  • Our Board Meetings are at our office, 698J Corporate Center Court, Westminster, MD  21157.  Board Meetings are the 3rd Thursday of the month, at 7 p.m.

    Maryland agriculture is vital to the long-term health of the state's economy, environment and quality of life. Maryland farmers - like homeowners and all residents - play a key role in protecting our state's natural resources, especially the Chesapeake Bay.

    Maryland farmers are conservation leaders in the Bay region because they use various conservation measures to produce healthy crops and livestock while protecting the environment and maintaining profitable businesses. Well-managed agricultural land provides many more environmental benefits than developed land.  

    Maryland farmers are conservation leaders in the Bay region because they use various conservation measures to produce healthy crops and livestock while protecting the environment and maintaining profitable businesses. Well-managed agricultural land provides many more environmental benefits than developed land.  

    Public Information Act (PIA) Requests
    For Inquiries/Requests, please contact:
     Charles "Ed"ward Null, Jr., District Manager
    Carroll Soil Conservation District
    698J Corporate Center Ct
    Westminster, MD  21157
    phone:  410-848-8200 Ext. 3
    fax:  410-848-8258
    ed.null@maryland.gov

  •